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Biosecurity Institute Warns of Hitchhikers Over Summer

People working to prevent the spread of invasive pests in New Zealand are asking holidaymakers to watch out for hitch hikers over the summer.

Key biosecurity sector interest group, the New Zealand Biosecurity Institute says its ongoing battle against unwanted animals plants and diseases will be helped greatly if people check and clean their gear before leaving and returning from the great outdoors this summer.

Institute President, Darion Embling said the threat or spreading an undesirable pest is very real this summer.

“Two very high profile invaders are mytle rust and kauri dieback. Both are on the rise at the moment.”

He said New Zealand’s native Christmas tree - the pōhutukawa is under threat, as well as other iconic natives such as rata and mānuka, from the recently arrived pest fungus myrtle rust.

 

“The kauri tree is already threatened with extinction by kauri dieback which can be spread by just a pinhead of soil, and you can't tell by looking whether a tree is infected or not.”

Myrtle rust, kauri dieback and other pests and diseases can be transported on clothing and equipment. That is why we are asking people to thoroughly check and clean outdoor clothing and equipment such as boots and tools to make sure there are no hitch hikers.

Mr Embling said the Institute has four biosecurity “please do’s” for people this summer:

  • clean your boots and outdoor equipment thoroughly and check for seeds, and dirt that could contain fungal spores

  • check, clean, and dry all equipment that has been in contact with waterways

  • remain on all tracks around kauri trees

  • dispose of garden waste or aquarium contents in the compost or at an appropriate waste management site

“At this time of year we also ask that people desex pets given as presents, and prevent them from roaming,” he said.

“We want people to take this time to think about what they can do to stop the spread of pest animals, plants, and diseases.”

These steps are very simple and yet will make a world of difference for our native species, and our agricultural industry,” he said.

The NZ Biosecurity Institute is the professional training and networking organisation for people involved in all aspects of biosecurity including pest animal and plant management, and border control. Its members work for research organisations, educational institutions, regional councils, government departments and private organisations. All are involved in protecting NZ from invasive species.

Mr Embling said every year Institute members spend hundreds of hours controlling or managing the risks to the economy and the environment of the effects of introduced pests.

"This is work which costs the country hundreds of millions of dollars each year through control, research and border control budgets. This money is coming out of all New Zealanders' pockets," he said.

ends

NOTE FOR EDITORS
For more information please contact: Darion Embling: (07) 859 0790 | 021 605 029 Media enquiries please contact: Chris Macann, Editor, Protect Magazine - The Magazine of the New Zealand Biosecurity Institute, phone 03 34 99 660 | 021 878 001

MYRTLE RUST (Puccinia psidii)

So far ramarama and pōhutukawa are the species most affected by Myrtle rust and these are the ones people should look at carefully.

People who think they have seen the distinctive yellow fungus, should not touch the plant or the rust, as this may spread it. If possible, they should get a good photo of the plant and the yellow patches, and call 0800 80 99 66.

KAURI DIEBACK (Phytophthora agathidicida)

The pathogen that causes kauri dieback, was only discovered in 2009. It can sense a kauri tree’s roots, and swim towards them using a tail-like flagella.

There is no cure for kauri dieback, and the disease kills most if not all the kauri it infects.

 
 

Biosecurity Institute Welcomes Dedicated Ministry

MEDIA RELEASE

From The New Zealand Biosecurity Institute

21 November, 2017

Key biosecurity sector interest group, the New Zealand Biosecurity Institute has welcomed the establishment of a stand-alone Ministry for Biosecurity.

Institute President, Darion Embling said his members are pleased to see the government treating biosecurity separately.

Previously responsibility for biosecurity lay with the Minister for Primary Industries.

"We see it as positive step because biosecurity involves far more than just the vital work of protecting primary industries.

"It also involves protecting native biodiversity which is critically in decline."

He said establishing the new ministry will ensure the return of the word "biosecurity" as a brand.

Mr Embling said the former "Biosecurity NZ" brand had become lost within the wider branding of what became the all-encompassing Ministry for Primary Industries.

He said it is also positive, that the new Minister for Biosecurity is also the Minister for Agriculture.

"That's good news too, because practical biosecurity starts at the farm gate.

"Farmers want to protect their own business and assets, so their livelihoods are dependent on strong biosecurity."

Mr Embling said he would like the single word "biosecurity" to be as common a catch-cry for all New Zealanders as the phrase "location, location, location".

The NZ Biosecurity Institute is the professional training and networking organisation for people involved in all aspects of biosecurity including pest animal and plant management, and border control. Its members work for research organisations, educational institutions, regional councils and government departments. All are involved in protecting NZ from invasive species.

Mr Embling said every year Institute members spend hundreds of hours controlling or managing the risks to the economy and the environment of the effects of introduced pests.

"This is work which costs the country hundreds of millions of dollars each year through control, research and border control budgets. This money is coming out of all New Zealanders' pockets," he said.

NOTE FOR EDITORS
For more information please contact: Darion Embling: (07) 859 0790 | 021 605 029 Media enquiries please contact: Chris Macann, Editor, Protect Magazine - The Magazine of the New Zealand Biosecurity Institute, phone 03 34 99 660 | 021 878 001

 
 

4.7 Million Sets of Eyes and Ears Vital for Biosecurity

July is Biosecurity Month – a month dedicated to promoting the importance of biosecurity to the country.

Those who work in the sector reckon New Zealanders should celebrate it as much as they do the All Blacks and Team New Zealand.

Biosecurity sector group the New Zealand Biosecurity Institute wants New Zealanders to know it’s not just sailing and rugby that Kiwis are world beaters at.

President Darion Embling said New Zealand is also recognised around the globe as a world champion of biosecurity.

“If there was a world cup for biosecurity we’d win it but we have to keep at it and we too need a support team of 4.7 million,” he said.

Mr Embling said the arrival of the plant killer Myrtle rust this year, which threatens important horticultural and iconic native plants, is a wake-up reminder that everyone must be vigilant.

myrtle-rust-on-leaves

Mr Embling said the next serious imminent threat is the agricultural pest the brown marmorated stink bug which is native to Asia but has spread to Europe and the Americas with devastating effects.

“The pest so far has been kept at bay but border control staff have intercepted them on a number of occasions at sites within New Zealand.

BMSB

“So far we have managed to prevent its establishment but we need 4.7 million sets of eyes and ears because we don’t know if there are small populations already present.”

He said New Zealand is fortunate to have a world class biosecurity system.

“Our pre and post-border surveillance system is second-to-none, and so is our research.”

Mr Embling said his members want to see the Biosecurity Sector have a high profile in the community as well as in the education curriculum.

"I'd like the word "biosecurity" to be as common a catch-cry for all New Zealanders as the phrase "location, location, location".

Biosecurity month occurs every July in the run-up to the NZ Biosecurity Institute's combined annual National Education and Training Seminars (NETS). This year NETS is in Wellington 9-11 August.

Mr Embling said every year, in the course of their jobs, NZBI members spend hundreds of hours controlling or managing the risks to the economy and the environment from the effects of unwanted pests.

“This work costs the country hundreds of millions of dollars each year through control, research and border control budgets. This money is coming out of all New Zealanders’ pockets,” he said.

“We need everyone to play a part in protecting what’s precious and unique about New Zealand.”

The NZBI is the professional training and networking organisation for people involved in biosecurity. Its 450 members work for research organisations, educational institutions, regional councils and government departments.

All are involved in protecting NZ from invasive species.

5654 biosecurity 2017 web

MEDIA RELEASE

From The New Zealand Biosecurity Institute

June 28, 2017

 

 
   

Biosecurity Month 2017 Banners

July is Biosecurity Month

Support this year's Biosecurity Month by adding the following banners to your Website, Facebook Page and Emails. Include a link to the New Zealand Biosecurity Institute website www.biosecurity.org.nz.

 

“The success of protecting New Zealand from biological threats from coming into and also within New Zealand is everyone working together. The emphasis of Biosecurity month 2017 is on collaboration between agencies, councils, government departments, NGOs and the community.”

 

 

 

The Basic Biosecurity Message

 

Biosecurity’ means protection from the risks posed by organisms to the economy, environment and people’s health, through exclusion, eradication and control procedures, actions and activities.‘

 

Biosecurity is vital to protect New Zealand’s ability to grow primary products, stay healthy, and preserve our natural heritage – our unique thumb print on the world. New Zealand is fortunate to have a world class biosecurity system, driven by primary producers and people who care about our biodiversity, and assisted by central and local government with legislation that enables effective management of those pests inside New Zealand, and a border and pre-border surveillance system second to none, and supported by world class research from a variety of science institutions.

 

Vigilance and understanding of the risks to biosecurity are vitally important. New Zealand is a trading nation and a tourist destination, and numbers of imports and visitors are increasing every year. New Zealand is free from many of the pests that limit trade and production in other countries and this is a huge advantage to our growers. We have a benign climate amenable to a variety of species not currently here, and we also have a significant number of pests, both actual and potential, here already. With global warming and biological changes potentially influencing the distribution and ability of pests to impact on habitats, we must never become complacent in our surveillance, search for knowledge or our ability to respond.

 

Sectors of the biosecurity system are all interlinked. They do not function in isolation but require each to be connected to the other to create a system stronger than its parts. The NZBI endeavours to foster relationships and avenues for the sharing of ideas and best practice information between all the sectors of the biosecurity system.

 

Keep up the good work!

 

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5654 biosecurity 2017 web

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5654 biosecurity 2017 facebook

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5654 biosecurity 2017 email

 

The Basic Biosecurity message

 

Biosecurity’ means protection from the risks posed by organisms to the economy, environment and people’s health, through exclusion, eradication and control procedures, actions and activities.‘

 

Biosecurity is vital to protect New Zealand’s ability to grow primary products, stay healthy, and preserve our natural heritage – our unique thumb print on the world. New Zealand is fortunate to have a world class biosecurity system, driven by primary producers and people who care about our biodiversity, and assisted by central and local government with legislation that enables effective management of those pests inside New Zealand, and a border and pre-border surveillance system second to none, and supported by world class research from a variety of science institutions.

 

Vigilance and understanding of the risks to biosecurity are vitally important. New Zealand is a trading nation and a tourist destination, and numbers of imports and visitors are increasing every year. New Zealand is free from many of the pests that limit trade and production in other countries and this is a huge advantage to our growers. We have a benign climate amenable to a variety of species not currently here, and we also have a significant number of pests, both actual and potential, here already. With global warming and biological changes potentially influencing the distribution and ability of pests to impact on habitats, we must never become complacent in our surveillance, search for knowledge or our ability to respond.

 

Sectors of the biosecurity system are all interlinked. They do not function in isolation but require each to be connected to the other to create a system stronger than its parts. The NZBI endeavours to foster relationships and avenues for the sharing of ideas and best practice information between all the sectors of the biosecurity system.

 

Keep up the good work!

 
 

NETS2017 Registration Open

Kia ora, everyone,

 

Finally, the NETS2017 programme is up on the website at https://www.nets2017.co.nz/ and registrations are now open, with a link from that page to the Eventzilla registration system we are using this year.

 

A couple of things to keep in mind:

 

  • You’ll need to have read the NETS2017 programme before you register and know which fieldtrip you want to select.  Only two have extra charges – The Halo and Zealandia ($35.00) and the Claybird Shoot ($35.00)

     

  • None of the registration categories include the Wednesday night Mix ‘n’ Mingle, so you need to tick the box and add this to your purchase when registering if you want to attend.

 

  • The full registrations for members and non-members include a ticket to the happy hour and the conference dinner. Student regos do not include a ticket to the happy hour and the conference dinner – you can purchase these as a separate item when you register.

 

You can pay by credit card through the PayPal option (you don’t need to register with PayPal to do this, read instructions on your screen carefully!), or receive an invoice for payment by choosing the ‘bank transfer’ option. 

 

The early bird discounts apply until 30 June, so get in quick!

 

As always, if you have any questions or need more info, please email me on This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it and we can work through it.

 
   

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